The big questions...


Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
How long do we mix for after adding the flour!?

Also, cupcakes shouldn’t be made using creaming method as it incorporates too much air?

How long do we cream for when making cakes?

No one ever speaks about these things but they definitely have an effect on the cake outcome.

Also, to Sieve or not to sieve?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
How long do we mix for after adding the flour!?

Also, cupcakes shouldn’t be made using creaming method as it incorporates too much air?

How long do we cream for when making cakes?

No one ever speaks about these things but they definitely have an effect on the cake outcome.

Also, to Sieve or not to sieve?

How long do we mix for after adding the flour!?

depends on method used.

creaming method: liquid and dry ingredients are added alternately starting and ending dry ingredients, mix until just combined. That means until the flour is just mixed in and just disappears. The key is scraping the sides AND bottom of the bowl in the middle of creaming the butter and sugar, and then again just before adding the liquid and dry ingredients. It is important that the butter is moved away from the sides of the bowl so the flour and liquid is incorporated into the all of the butter.

foam method: liquid is mixed into the dry ingredients, then the whipped eggs are folded into the batter. Its critical the folding techique is correct and contrary to what most instuctions say about using a spatula, use a balloon whisk. Rotate the bowl while folding. Fold whipped egg whites in until there are just a few wisps of white.

Ribboned eggs: ribboned eggs depends more on proper heating and beating of the eggs. If that is done correctly, the flour is sifted over the ribboned eggs and gently folded in.



Also, cupcakes shouldn’t be made using creaming method as it incorporates too much air?

Creaming doesn’t produce too much air, quite the contary, butter cakes have lower volume because the butter is heavy.

Oil based cake batters produce a rubbery texture. So while many bakers prefer them for the moist crumb, I nix them for the weird texture. I prefer either butter or chiffon batters.

How long do we cream for when making cakes?
Creaming butter and sugar for cake is the same as for cookies. The science doesn’t change because the reason for using and creaming butter does not change. It is for leavening, to trap the air bubbles created by the baking powder and/or baking soda. It the butter is too warm, it will be too soft to expand and trap the bubbles and expand. If it does not expand in the early stages of baking, the cake is dense. So it has to be cold, 65°F (18°C) or less.

.
Also, to Sieve or not to sieve?
Sieve for cake-always. If adding salt and leavening to the flour. Three times. It is about proper distribution of the leavening and salt in the flour. Alternatievly add the salt and leavening to the butter when creaming. THEN sieve the flour once to loosen it up so your cake is light. There are those who sieve and those who don’t. You have seen my cakes. They are light and airy. Judge for yourself. Our cake is only as good as our effort.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
How long do we mix for after adding the flour!?

depends on method used.

creaming method: liquid and dry ingredients are added alternately starting and ending dry ingredients, mix until just combined. That means until the flour is just mixed in and just disappears. The key is scraping the sides AND bottom of the bowl in the middle of creaming the butter and sugar, and then again just before adding the liquid and dry ingredients. It is important that the butter is moved away from the sides of the bowl so the flour and liquid is incorporated into the all of the butter.

foam method: liquid is mixed into the dry ingredients, then the whipped eggs are folded into the batter. Its critical the folding techique is correct and contrary to what most instuctions say about using a spatula, use a balloon whisk. Rotate the bowl while folding. Fold whipped egg whites in until there are just a few wisps of white.

Ribboned eggs: ribboned eggs depends more on proper heating and beating of the eggs. If that is done correctly, the flour is sifted over the ribboned eggs and gently folded in.



Also, cupcakes shouldn’t be made using creaming method as it incorporates too much air?

Creaming doesn’t produce too much air, quite the contary, butter cakes have lower volume because the butter is heavy.

Oil based cake batters produce a rubbery texture. So while many bakers prefer them for the moist crumb, I nix them for the weird texture. I prefer either butter or chiffon batters.

How long do we cream for when making cakes?
Creaming butter and sugar for cake is the same as for cookies. The science doesn’t change because the reason for using and creaming butter does not change. It is for leavening, to trap the air bubbles created by the baking powder and/or baking soda. It the butter is too warm, it will be too soft to expand and trap the bubbles and expand. If it does not expand in the early stages of baking, the cake is dense. So it has to be cold, 65°F (18°C) or less.

.
Also, to Sieve or not to sieve?
Sieve for cake-always. If adding salt and leavening to the flour. Three times. It is about proper distribution of the leavening and salt in the flour. Alternatievly add the salt and leavening to the butter when creaming. THEN sieve the flour once to loosen it up so your cake is light. There are those who sieve and those who don’t. You have seen my cakes. They are light and airy. Judge for yourself. Our cake is only as good as our effort.

Thanks for the detailed response.

The issue I’ve found with sieving is that it seems to depend on whether or not the recipe accounts for it. I find that if it doesn’t, then the flour can end up too fine for the batter and you end up with a wetter product.

I also use butter as opposed to oil. The downside to butter is that cakes can be a little dry if they don’t turn out as planned, but the downside to oil is that they can end up oily if they don’t turn out as planned.


Does the idea of the all in one method sound awful to you? I’m not sure how vital the creaming is. I guess it’s pretty important as you said that it helps with rising but then many recipes don’t call for it.

Th
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
Thanks for the detailed response.

The issue I’ve found with sieving is that it seems to depend on whether or not the recipe accounts for it. I find that if it doesn’t, then the flour can end up too fine for the batter and you end up with a wetter product.

I also use butter as opposed to oil. The downside to butter is that cakes can be a little dry if they don’t turn out as planned, but the downside to oil is that they can end up oily if they don’t turn out as planned.


Does the idea of the all in one method sound awful to you? I’m not sure how vital the creaming is. I guess it’s pretty important as you said that it helps with rising but then many recipes don’t call for it.

Th
Sieving the flour is not going to cause the batter to wetter. The hydration to flour is the hydration no matter if you sieve or not. If anything, the flour will absorb the liquid faster if it is sieved, so will thicken up faster, rather than slower. Not in the end, the ratio of flour to liquid will determine how wet/dry the batter is.

Yes a butter can can be drier. You have to get the right ratio of butter to flour, you want at. least 45% butter to flour in a butter cake. I like to add some additional fat in the form of sour cream as well. I just can’t to the oil based cakes because the texture is too rubbery. I’ll do chiffon cake because it‘s a foam cake, so a different texture. But I still add a tad bit of sour cream to my chiffon to give it a bit softer crumb. I have yet to find an all oil cake that I like.

The all in one is designed for cake flour and oil. The cake flour provides a lighter and higher rise, and the oil doesn’t need to be creamed like butter and sugar. So it’s about matching the right ingredients to the mixing method. It won’t produce the same high rise as a foam or creamed cake, but it will produce a decent enough cake without a lot of work.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
Sieving the flour is not going to cause the batter to wetter. The hydration to flour is the hydration no matter if you sieve or not. If anything, the flour will absorb the liquid faster if it is sieved, so will thicken up faster, rather than slower. Not in the end, the ratio of flour to liquid will determine how wet/dry the batter is.

Yes a butter can can be drier. You have to get the right ratio of butter to flour, you want at. least 45% butter to flour in a butter cake. I like to add some additional fat in the form of sour cream as well. I just can’t to the oil based cakes because the texture is too rubbery. I’ll do chiffon cake because it‘s a foam cake, so a different texture. But I still add a tad bit of sour cream to my chiffon to give it a bit softer crumb. I have yet to find an all oil cake that I like.

The all in one is designed for cake flour and oil. The cake flour provides a lighter and higher rise, and the oil doesn’t need to be creamed like butter and sugar. So it’s about matching the right ingredients to the mixing method. It won’t produce the same high rise as a foam or creamed cake, but it will produce a decent enough cake without a lot of work.
Thanks very much for the info.

Cupcake Jemma said that you shouldn’t cream cupcakes as it adds too much air as they risk deflation in the oven..

It’s all a little confusing as some recipes state that you should mix for several minutes after adding the flour, some just say to fold, some say use the all in one, some say cream butter and sugar first.

It blows my mind! In the end, I think that it’s just trial and error. You have to try different methods to find out what works for each recipe.
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
Thanks very much for the info.

Cupcake Jemma said that you shouldn’t cream cupcakes as it adds too much air as they risk deflation in the oven..

It’s all a little confusing as some recipes state that you should mix for several minutes after adding the flour, some just say to fold, some say use the all in one, some say cream butter and sugar first.

It blows my mind! In the end, I think that it’s just trial and error. You have to try different methods to find out what works for each recipe.
Tens of thousands of cupcakes are baked every using the creaming method every year. I make cupcakes using the creaming method. So I know for a fact the creaming method does not cause cupcakes to collapse. I think a lot of problems are caused by creaming butter and sugar at the wrong temperature.

i’m starting to see recipes on the Internet with a notation stating cool butter or 65°F (18°C). So people are starting to get it right. But the “room temperature“ nonsense is so ingrained in people that it’s near impossible to set the record straight.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
Tens of thousands of cupcakes are baked every using the creaming method every year. I make cupcakes using the creaming method. So I know for a fact the creaming method does not cause cupcakes to collapse. I think a lot of problems are caused by creaming butter and sugar at the wrong temperature.

i’m starting to see recipes on the Internet with a notation stating cool butter or 65°F (18°C). So people are starting to get it right. But the “room temperature“ nonsense is so ingrained in people that it’s near impossible to set the record straight.

I much prefer the creaming method results. I tried the all in one method today and the cupcake was denser.

I can now use my thermapen to check the temperature of the butter which is great!

Do you often make cupcakes?
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
I much prefer the creaming method results. I tried the all in one method today and the cupcake was denser.

I can now use my thermapen to check the temperature of the butter which is great!

Do you often make cupcakes?
Yes I think what inevitably happens is people throw way too warm squishy butter into the bowl with sugar, crank it up to high. Never set a timer. Throw in warm eggs. It’s already too warm to begin with, and they have no idea how long they’ve beaten it.

They bake it in an oven that’s much too hot at 350°F (170°C). So the batter is creamed at the wrong temperature, over beaten, too warm, baked too hot, so it fails.

Just that simple act of checking the temperature of your butter, using a cold egg and 325°F (160°C) oven temperature you get a really nice cupcake.

That’s great that you’re using your thermometer. If I had to name one tool as the single most important tool in the kitchen, I would say it’s thermometer.

I don’t bake cupcakes very often, maybe every couple of months. Mainly for/with my niece. She’s a little cupcake monster these days when it comes to chocolate cupcakes. It’s something that she can help bake. And of course she loves to decorate with the pastry bag. She has her own chef’s jacket, apron, she even has a chef’s hat.

Her little creation
EA724A7A-5C43-4DD1-A80F-8229340DE60B.jpeg
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
Yes I think what inevitably happens is people throw way too warm squishy butter into the bowl with sugar, crank it up to high. Never set a timer. Throw in warm eggs. It’s already too warm to begin with, and they have no idea how long they’ve beaten it.

They bake it in an oven that’s much too hot at 350°F (170°C). So the batter is creamed at the wrong temperature, over beaten, too warm, baked too hot, so it fails.

Just that simple act of checking the temperature of your butter, using a cold egg and 325°F (160°C) oven temperature you get a really nice cupcake.

That’s great that you’re using your thermometer. If I had to name one tool as the single most important tool in the kitchen, I would say it’s thermometer.

I don’t bake cupcakes very often, maybe every couple of months. Mainly for/with my niece. She’s a little cupcake monster these days when it comes to chocolate cupcakes. It’s something that she can help bake. And of course she loves to decorate with the pastry bag. She has her own chef’s jacket, apron, she even has a chef’s hat.

Her little creation
View attachment 3221

This is very useful information!!! So the egg should be cold????

18c for the butter and what for the egg?

I usually bake at 165 but will decrease to 160?

Cupcake looks lovely
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
This is very useful information!!! So the egg should be cold????

18c for the butter and what for the egg?

I usually bake at 165 but will decrease to 160?

Cupcake looks lovely
I bake all my cakes and cupcakes at 160°C with rare exception. The exceptions are cakes with a lot of items such as a carrot cake. cupcakes are very small so they bake fast. I don’t want a dry crust, so the lower temperature works better.

The egg I use straight from the refrigerator.



Read Stella Parks article on creaming butter. She creams butter at 16°C (60°F), but the teaching in culinary pastry programs is 18°C (65°F). I actually cream butter colder than Stella. Part of it is experince and knowing what to look for in your butter. But really read this article, it will help you better understand the purpose of creaming. Most bakers don’t understand the key is the plasticity of the butter. They get that creaming butter is mechanical leavening; they just don’t get that if the butter is too warm the butter cannot hold its shape to trap the air and expand. If the butter cannot trap the air AND EXPAND, then you don’t get the full benefit of mechanical leavening. It is simply not enough to to whip the butter. The butter has to be the correct temperature and prevented from going above a certain temperature. So the egg temperature matters too. So you understand now why you should know the batter temperature before baking now:cool: That ThermaPen is your most important tool.

 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
So should the egg actually be COLD?

Also, I made a cake today using stork which is a well known spread that is used for baking here. The stork was only 10 degrees Celsius straight from the fridge as it isn’t like butter.

Also, it’s an all in one method so there’s no creaming involved.
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2020
Messages
142
Reaction score
41
The temperature of the eggs for the creaming method is a question I've had too. In Stella Parks' creaming article, she specifically mentions a cold egg for the cookie recipe used as a reference to keep the butter temperature cool enough (below 68°F/20°C).

In my personal tests for cookie recipes, using butter straight from the fridge (~57°F), the mixture gets to about 68°F after 4.5-5 minutes of creaming at medium speed before eggs are added.

However, Stella also writes that using cold eggs is specific to that particular recipe due to the low ratio of eggs to butter. In other circumstances, there may be emulsification or curdling problems if the eggs are cold. In many recipes I've seen from other professionals using the creaming method, they specify room temperature eggs. So are there any guidelines on when it's ok to use cold eggs, and when you should use room temperature eggs?
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
So should the egg actually be COLD?

Also, I made a cake today using stork which is a well known spread that is used for baking here. The stork was only 10 degrees Celsius straight from the fridge as it isn’t like butter.

Also, it’s an all in one method so there’s no creaming involved.


Stork is margarine for eating. Since it’s an oil, plasticity is an issue. Margarine used in commercial baking is tempered specifically to certain levels so it’s plasticity is most like butter. That way it can be used in applications like puff pastry. But retail margarine is made for eating, so whether any given brand is tempered for baking is anyone’s guess. Some brands perform better than others in baking applications. But always use stick margarine, never margarine in a tub for baking. The tub margarine is definitely not tempered.

So how Stork creams compared to butter I wouldn’t know. And creaming is NOT mixing. You must burn that into your memory. CREAMING IS NOT MIXING. CREAMING IS MECHANICAL LEAVENING. Creaming has nothing to do with mixing two or more ingredients. Creaming has one purpose, and that is to create air pockets in the butter by cutting it with the sugar crystals.

So keep you mixing techniques clear in your mind.

So the temperature of you butter/margarine when you CREAM butter/margarine is 65°F (18°C) because you are going to ADD friction heat. The friction heat is ADDED during the 4 to 5 minutes of beating. After you ADD friction heat, that butter/margarine will not be 65°F (18°C). It will be 3 or 4 degrees warmer. May be more depending on your mixer and the temperature of you kitchen. So the cold egg brings the temperature of the butter down.

Now if you are NOT creaming the butter/margarine, then you are NOT adding friction heat. So if you are mixing by hand, and all in one, then you really don’t have any additional added friction factor—you aren’t really adding any friction heat to make a lot of difference. So you can start with butter/margarine that is near you target batter temperature of around 68°F (20°C). And your egg can be at that temperature too.

Mix - why we mix

  1. Uniform distribution of all ingredients
  2. Effect leavening from chemical leaveners
  3. Incorporate air into ingredients and trigger protein denaturation
  4. lighten batters with foams, e.g., whipped egg whites, whipped cream
  5. Development OR minimize development of gluten


There are many ways to mix batters and doughs. The mixing method that you choose will depend on the type of baked product you will make. Many baked goods require you to use more than one type of mixing method.

Beating: agitate ingredients vigorously to incorporate air or develop gluten. A mixer using attachments like just as a whisk, paddle, or dough hook attachment is used. By hand use a hand whisk or spoon.


Blending/stirring: Mixing two or more ingredients together until evenly combined. May be done by hand with a spoon, whisk, rubber spatula, or with a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment.

Sieve/shift: pass two or more dry ingredients through a mesh frame utensil to distribute smaller portions evenly into larger portions of dry ingredients

Cut in: roughly cut in solid fat (chilled butter, shortening, lard, etc.) into dry ingredients leaving coarse bits of fat visible. By hand, a pastry cutter, two knives is used. Other hand techniques include rubbing fat and dry ingredients between two fingers or s a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, or two knives to cut in fat. You may also rub the fat and flour between your fingers.


Folding: Gently blending an airy foam, such as whipped egg whites or whipped cream into a heavier batter to lighten it. Using a balloon whisk to keep from deflating the foam, the batter is lifted up from the bottom of the bowl with the balloon whisk and folded over the foam, then the whisk drawn gently down through the center of the batter to lift it up and fold it over again. The bowl is rotated as the foam in folded in.


Whipping: agitating ingredients vigorously to incorporate air and and trigger partial protein denaturation of ingredients like egg whites or heavy cream.

  • Creaming is NOT mixing
  • Creaming is NOT blending/stirring two or more ingredients to combine.
  • Creaming is NOT cutting a fat into a dry ingredient
  • Creaming is NOT folding a foam into a batter
  • Creaming is NOT whipping an ingredient to incorporate air and trigger protein denaturation
Creaming butter and sugar is to cut air pockets into the butter using the sugar crystals. While you can cream butter and sugar by hand using a flat surface, like the back side of a spoon, it is most effective with the paddle attachment of a stand mixer. Creaming butter and sugar is not done well with a hand mixer because the beaters incorporate a lot of air into the butter, and Whipping is NOT the same as Creaming.
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
The temperature of the eggs for the creaming method is a question I've had too. In Stella Parks' creaming article, she specifically mentions a cold egg for the cookie recipe used as a reference to keep the butter temperature cool enough (below 68°F/20°C).

In my personal tests for cookie recipes, using butter straight from the fridge (~57°F), the mixture gets to about 68°F after 4.5-5 minutes of creaming at medium speed before eggs are added.

However, Stella also writes that using cold eggs is specific to that particular recipe due to the low ratio of eggs to butter. In other circumstances, there may be emulsification or curdling problems if the eggs are cold. In many recipes I've seen from other professionals using the creaming method, they specify room temperature eggs. So are there any guidelines on when it's ok to use cold eggs, and when you should use room temperature eggs?
When you beat butter for five minutes, you cause friction heat. It doesn’t matter what that butter is going to be used for—you cannot beat butter for 4 - 5 minutes and not increase the temperature. So you need to control the over all temperature of what ever it is you are making from there.

I started with slightly warmer I believe than this 48.7°F (9.27°C), but not much; a degree or two. I am very impatient when I want to get started on a project.
AC69C8D8-ED0A-4C9C-A704-E2321E48C582.jpeg



I set my timer when creaming butter and sugar beat 2 min; scrape; 2 min 30 sec. So even after a cold egg, this is where my dough ended up: 67.6°F (19.7°C). My target was 68°F (20°C). I’m usually within 1 or 2 degrees of my target, but I almost hit that one on the dot. How warm the butter gets during beating will vary. Every mixer is different. And kitchen temperatures change constantly. In the winter when my kitchen is cold, I will put my eggs in a bowl of warm water because the kitchen is freezing cold. And I will warm my butter up more before I begin.
23CF4CF6-54BA-4F7A-B3C4-70DF9575C73E.jpeg



Edit: I think I answered your question about guidelines when I answered @LamsMekk.
 
Joined
Feb 12, 2020
Messages
142
Reaction score
41
When you beat butter for five minutes, you cause friction heat. It doesn’t matter what that butter is going to be used for—you cannot beat butter for 4 - 5 minutes and not increase the temperature. So you need to control the over all temperature of what ever it is you are making from there.

I started with slightly warmer I believe than this 48.7°F (9.27°C), but not much; a degree or two. I am very impatient when I want to get started on a project.
View attachment 3231


I set my timer when creaming butter and sugar beat 2 min; scrape; 2 min 30 sec. So even after a cold egg, this is where my dough ended up: 67.6°F (19.7°C). My target was 68°F (20°C). I’m usually within 1 or 2 degrees of my target, but I almost hit that one on the dot. How warm the butter gets during beating will vary. Every mixer is different. And kitchen temperatures change constantly. In the winter when my kitchen is cold, I will put my eggs in a bowl of warm water because the kitchen is freezing cold. And I will warm my butter up more before I begin.
View attachment 3230


Edit: I think I answered your question about guidelines when I answered @LamsMekk.
Okay I see that you set the butter and egg temperatures relative to the target dough/batter temperature, taking into account the friction heat and room temperature. If I'm correct, the target temperature is 68°F/20°C if aiming to maximize aeration when creaming?

However, my question was also about potential emulsification/curdling issues. Let's say for cake mixing, since those formulas generally have a much higher proportion of eggs relative to butter. If we assume a target temperature of 68°F/20°C (if I'm correct about that being ideal for aeration), then the butter and eggs should be fairly cold. But then wouldn't there be situations where the large amount of cold eggs might not be able to emulsify properly into the butter?

Or does the problem solve itself, e.g. since we're using more eggs than for say a cookie dough, then the temperature of the eggs don't have to be as cold to end up with the target of 68°F/20°C, thereby avoiding curdling the butter or not emulsifying properly?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
Okay I see that you set the butter and egg temperatures relative to the target dough/batter temperature, taking into account the friction heat and room temperature. If I'm correct, the target temperature is 68°F/20°C if aiming to maximize aeration when creaming?

However, my question was also about potential emulsification/curdling issues. Let's say for cake mixing, since those formulas generally have a much higher proportion of eggs relative to butter. If we assume a target temperature of 68°F/20°C (if I'm correct about that being ideal for aeration), then the butter and eggs should be fairly cold. But then wouldn't there be situations where the large amount of cold eggs might not be able to emulsify properly into the butter?

Or does the problem solve itself, e.g. since we're using more eggs than for say a cookie dough, then the temperature of the eggs don't have to be as cold to end up with the target of 68°F/20°C, thereby avoiding curdling the butter or not emulsifying properly?
i’ve never had a cake batter curdle on me. By the time that butter is beaten, it’s pretty warm. The other ingredients (liquids, dry ingredients) are in the same temperature range as your target temperature. I suppose if everything else was ice cold, it could cause the batter to curdle. I personally don’t believe what they say about cold egg alone as a cause of a curdled batter.

The explanation is the cold egg resolidify is the fat. But it would take a massive amount of ice cold egg to cause all that butter to drop in temperature that fast and to the point that it re-solidifies. It would have to be this draumatic temperature drop to seize up all that butter.

Here’s the thing when you add the egg you beat it in additions, so you add more friction heat. So you raise the temperature of the egg when you beat it in.

I think something else happens with a curdled batter. It just does not makes sense that the temperature of the egg in the amount that is typical in a cake causes the emulsion to break.

But that’s just my opinion. I don’t know if there’s any actual scientific research on it or not. I’ve never had a curdled batter. I broke meringue icing once to my horror. But never a cake batter.

edit: and as they say the proof is in the pudding. You’ve seen pics of my cakes they rise to the full height of the tin. They are light and airy. So I guess what I do works, at least for my formulas.
 
Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
Great info thank you.

To we cream for 4-5 minutes irrespective of whether or not we’re using margarine or butter?

The recipe for vanilla cake that I plan to bake now uses stork. Stork is used often in the U.K. as it is a certified baking spread.

Some recipes state that you can use either or, but since butter and Stork have different properties I think that it’s unlikely that one would get the same result from both.

I have been creaming my butter and sugar for too long I think, so thank you for that information as I now know that 4-5 minutes is the maximum amount of time that I should do so.

I’m off to bake this cake, I’ll let you know how it comes out! Hopefully, if it is successful, I will post a picture.

Thanks a lot
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
Great info thank you.

To we cream for 4-5 minutes irrespective of whether or not we’re using margarine or butter?

The recipe for vanilla cake that I plan to bake now uses stork. Stork is used often in the U.K. as it is a certified baking spread.

Some recipes state that you can use either or, but since butter and Stork have different properties I think that it’s unlikely that one would get the same result from both.

I have been creaming my butter and sugar for too long I think, so thank you for that information as I now know that 4-5 minutes is the maximum amount of time that I should do so.

I’m off to bake this cake, I’ll let you know how it comes out! Hopefully, if it is successful, I will post a picture.

Thanks a lot
That is correct, Margarine and butter will not produce the same texture. Margarine is vegetable oil. It usually contains about 20% water, but that can vary by brand. Butter is animal fat (milk fat). It contains between 18% to 16% water. Sometimes less depending on the breed of cow, diet, and other factors.

Margarine has a higher melting point than butter. Oil produced a more rubbery crumb in cake/cupcakes.

Looking forward to seeing how your cake turns out.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 30, 2020
Messages
158
Reaction score
25
So I’ve got a problem!

My cakes are coming out really oily. One of them was very dense but I didn’t cream the butter and sugar For more than a minute or two (long story).
The other one is oily, like if I touch it my finger is wet with oil.

I use very very little grease and I dust pan with flour also, I don’t use grease on the bottom of the pan just baking paper.

I’m very confused!

The picture isn’t clean but the cake is oily
 

Attachments


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top