Too Rich cake!

Joined
Apr 19, 2022
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
I recently made a 8inch 3 tier chocolate cake. It was sandwiched with the chocolate buttercream and also decorated on the outside with the same buttercream then decorated with lots of different chocolates as it was a chocolate overload cake. A few days later I spoke to the customer and she said she was really pleased with it and it was beautifully decorated and baked perfectly the only thing was that it was too rich and also didn’t need as many chocolate decorations on the outside ( this I was a bit confused with as she ordered a chocolate overload!) My question is is there anything I can do to reduce the richness of the cakes? And has anyone else had this feedback before?
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
48
Reaction score
9
I don't think you should change your recipe. I think your customer's personal taste is just that - SHE found the cake too rich. Have you had similar comments on this cake before? It sounds decadent and delicious to a chocolate lover like me!
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
4,063
Reaction score
2,080
I recently made a 8inch 3 tier chocolate cake. It was sandwiched with the chocolate buttercream and also decorated on the outside with the same buttercream then decorated with lots of different chocolates as it was a chocolate overload cake. A few days later I spoke to the customer and she said she was really pleased with it and it was beautifully decorated and baked perfectly the only thing was that it was too rich and also didn’t need as many chocolate decorations on the outside ( this I was a bit confused with as she ordered a chocolate overload!) My question is is there anything I can do to reduce the richness of the cakes? And has anyone else had this feedback before?

If you’re offering custom cakes then yes you have to make adjustments to suit your customers’ tastes.

If you are using American icing (powered sugar, shortening and/or butter) then the cake will be too sweet.

Of course if you are working from a home kitchen in the US then legally you cannot use any other type of icing. If this is the case unfortunately there’s not a lot you can do to fix the icing. American icing is very poor quality.

High-end bakeries and pastry chefs never use this type of icing because it is cloyingly sweet.

Swiss or Italian meringue buttercream or Mascarpone Chantilly icings are the preferred choices.

The quality of the chocolate also matters. Cheaper chocolate and compound chocolate has more sugar. There is no way to control sweetness or chocolate flavor when using cheap chocolate since these grades of chocolate do not offer options.

Coverture chocolate comes in a variety of percentages. The higher the number, the higher the cocoa mass (cocoa liquor, cocoa butter). For example chocolate labeled 70% contains 70% cocoa mass, and 30% of other ingredients (sugar, vanilla, etc.). I find the average Americans prefer a chocolate about 60% – 63%. Callebaut is a good choice. Children prefer milk chocolate over dark chocolate. For children some thing like Ghirardelli is better suited.

Those with a more sophisticated palate prefer a 70% chocolate. When I use 70%, it's Valrhona chocolate. likewise all white chocolate is Valrhona because there is a marked difference in the flavor and sweetness

The flavor of the chocolate product can be enriched by using a single origin chocolate or a specific blend.

It’s always best to ask the customer brands of products they love. When discussing chocolate, if a customer says they love See’s brand candy, then their preference is definitely on the sweeter side. Then go with a 60% – 63% Callebaut chocolate. If their preference is for fine chocolate, then you definitely want to go with a higher percentage chocolate.

Remember too that custom cake means adjusting the price accordingly. You should have a range of prices per serving based on the various levels of quality ingredients.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 2022
Messages
9
Reaction score
4
When we do a buttercream frosting (real butter only, please!) we generally spread it more thinly, particularly between the layers. I like the flavor of the buttercream, but a little goes a long way.

You could also use a ganache then control the sugar amount by the type of chocolate you choose. It will still be rich, but not necessarily so sweet.
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2020
Messages
1,026
Reaction score
214
I recently made a 8inch 3 tier chocolate cake. It was sandwiched with the chocolate buttercream and also decorated on the outside with the same buttercream then decorated with lots of different chocolates as it was a chocolate overload cake. A few days later I spoke to the customer and she said she was really pleased with it and it was beautifully decorated and baked perfectly the only thing was that it was too rich and also didn’t need as many chocolate decorations on the outside ( this I was a bit confused with as she ordered a chocolate overload!) My question is is there anything I can do to reduce the richness of the cakes? And has anyone else had this feedback before?
Thats the nature of those tall cakes with heavy layers and heavy filling to prevent the cake from falling over.
European cakes are the opposite, not tall, not heavy.
Buttercream can easily over power a cake if you don't use restraint , using too large decorating tips will put too much buttercream on the cake.
Sadly, most people want that, they don't have educated palates so you might as well keep making them too rich because you'll do a lot more business.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
6,536
Messages
47,213
Members
5,487
Latest member
niki83

Latest Threads

Top