Breads with filling

Discussion in 'Bread' started by Shilpa Wadji, Nov 26, 2017.

  1. Shilpa Wadji

    Shilpa Wadji Member

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    Hi,

    I would like to know the types of breads that come with a centre filling.
    which fillings are used as a centre filling breads, rolls, and buns?
    Kindly provide a ranking for these centre filings used in the bread.

    I know some fillings used in bread such as Chocolate, vanilla, meat, vegetable, caramel, nuts, and fruits. are these used in bread as centre fillings? If yes, which ones are famous across the world? If no, then which ones are used?
     
    Shilpa Wadji, Nov 26, 2017
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  2. Shilpa Wadji

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Again there are no rankings. And very very few breads are filled. Bread is considered the highest form of baking. Bakers want to highlight the flavor of the flour, fermentation, and the technique. Putting a filling in bread distracts from the bread itself.

    Pasty or piroshki could contain anything from potato, to ground meat, to liver. And it comes down to personal preference again. It’s not about what the world likes, it’s about with the individual likes.

    It seems are trying to do research to develop a product line. You need to research the specific tastes of your specific market.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Nov 26, 2017
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  3. Shilpa Wadji

    Shilpa Wadji Member

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    Hi Norcalbaker59,

    Thanks for your response.

    I have some more questions in regards to bread and similar baked items. I know that there are some companies providing bread (buns) with meat, vegetables, and cream fillings like BreadTalk in Singapore. Are there similar kinds of bread items available in Americas and Europe.
    • What about Buns and rolls?
    • Do these come with fillings?
    • If yes, what type of fillings are preferred by consumers?
    • Can you provide those fillings in a ranking from most to the least popularity?
    Fillings such as Chocolate, Caramel, Vanilla, Nuts, and Fruits.
    • Are there any other kinds of fillings in demand especially for buns and rolls?

    Some bakeries are offering buns with meat fillings to its customers.
    • Are such fillings in demand for the American and European regions?
     
    Shilpa Wadji, Nov 28, 2017
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  4. Shilpa Wadji

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Americans don’t really eat filled buns. Americans eat sandwiches and burgers.

    Slavic (Eastern Europe and Russia) eat piroshki and belyashi

    Chinese eat a steamed meat bun, char siu bao.

    British and Scottish eat pasty, which is a hand pie.

    Australians eat a meat pie similar to the pasty.

    Americans also do not eat sweet filled buns. The only thing sweet that is filled are things like doughnuts and eclairs. But both will only be eaten fresh. They both go stale very quickly and they freeze horribly.

    Market research in America consistently finds 76% of consumers say it’s very important that their baked goods are baked fresh. Demand for freshness is even higher among millennials. And it’s the millennials who make up the lion’s share of the snack matrket

    And the millennials are reshape the entire snack market, including the bakery industry. They’ve directed bakery trends here toward artisan bakeries. The sift is away from the traditional baked goods and toward the savory, like savory muffins and cookies.

    Millennials are concerned with the origins of their food, the quality of the ingredients, how ingredients are sourced, and the methods used to produce the final product. For mellennials it is all about authenticity and providence.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Nov 28, 2017
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  5. Shilpa Wadji

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    Americans eat TONS of filled pastry. We call them "pot pies", notably the hand held version...which can be bought at the grocery store from a brand called "Hot Pockets".

    These are crusts filled with veggies, meats, and cheeses. There is also the basic pot pie which is made like a pie, but has all the ingredients a stew or casserole might have, encased in a crust.

    Norcalbaker is right about the buns though, thats pretty much a British thing, as I don't know many other countries who eat a lot of filled breads. Here in America, we usually use some sort of pie crust. The Asians usually have small filled buns and breads, but they are more bite-sized desserts than bread.

    Americans also eat a lot of Kolaches, which are small sausages wrapped in a roll and baked. Probably the closest thing you are talking about, that we eat here.

    There are people who eat filled buns here, and some bakeries do sell them here, but they aren't extremely popular by any means. Some Asian and European style restaurants will have them on the menu, but they are more of an appetizer or lunch item here in America.

    As for dessert breads or sweet breads, probably the most popular thing here in America is the cinnamon roll. It's made with a variety of bread doughs, and is sold, made, and eaten all over the country. There are thousands of different recipes for cinnamon rolls, but the standard recipe is just a simple cinnamon filling with simple glaze.

    I will have to correct Norcalbaker on something though............eclairs, donuts, cream horns, and even chocolate filled croissant can be found pre-made in most grocery stores here in America. They can be found in the freezer section or in the bakery section of the grocery store. Having worked in many grocery store bakeries, I can tell you that we used to make all of that on-site in the grocery store bakery, but since the late 1990's, grocery stores have either invested in their own production factories or outsource the making of these products, as they are shipped to the stores now, ready made and frozen. All the bakery clerks do nowadays is remove them from the box, fill them, glaze them, put them into containers and place them out in the store for consumers to buy.

    And actually, some of those eclairs aren't too bad. Cream horns are my favorite though.

    As for the millennials, I haven't noticed any changes in the snack market. Twinkies, Ding Dongs, Ho Ho's, fried fruit pies, Oreos, and Chips Ahoy are still making billions a year selling these things.

    I also haven't seen many instances where millennials want or demand "fresh" anything. If they want "fresh" they usually go through a drive thru at some fast food place, or a local donut shop that has a drive thru.

    There are artisan bakeries all around, but they have always been around, as long as I can remember, so I really haven't seen any changes in that either. And most of these artisan bakeries are too expensive for the middle class of working people. A lot of these mom and pop bakeries and artisan bakeries have either had to lower prices to stay in business, move to a higher wage neighborhood to keep their prices, or just go out of business.

    From what I've seen over the years, more and more people are getting lazier and lazier to the point they can't even be bothered to learn how to operate a microwave, much less know how to boil water or make something from scratch. They want ready made, fast, convenient, and CHEAP. This is why grocery stores have gotten so big, physically I mean. Pretty much every grocery store wants to be a "one stop shop" for everybody.

    So it's a lot easier to find all these snack items, even if they are produced in a factory and shipped to the stores frozen, before being placed out for the public to buy.


    If this were 30 years ago, I could tell you what was popular here, what sold the most here. But now, since stores want to carry everything for everybody, and you can pretty much get anything you want............it's hard to say what the most popular breads, rolls, or pastries are. There are just so many to choose from, they pretty much are all the most popular.
     
    ChesterV, Nov 29, 2017
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  6. Shilpa Wadji

    Shilpa Wadji Member

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    Hello ChesterV,

    Thank you for your response.

    The information you provided did give me a deeper insight in the consumer preference.

    I am asking questions mostly on baked goods that come with a filling because i had read a random comment about the demand for filled baked goods increasing.
    • Any idea about the volume sales (in tonnes) of baked goods in Americas and Europe? (as per your knowledge- an approximate volume on global level is also fine)
    Questions: (in terms of volume)
    • An approximate percentage for the filled category in bread and roll category (eg 54% for simple bread and 46% for filled bread and rolls)
    • An approximate percentage for the filled category in cakes and pastries category
    • An approximate percentage for the filled category in cookies/sweet biscuits category
    • An approximate percentage for the filled category in bread and roll category
    • Are there any specific brands which are prefered by the consumers in Americas and Europe?
    The below questions are related to the other regions across the world. As majority of the bakery trends are being introduced in the Asian markets especially India.
    • What are your thoughts on vanilla and caramel fillings in the baked goods? Especially in regards to the consumer's taste preference
    • I read across various articles online about the share of artisanal bakeries rising rapidly across the world. But as per your response that is not the case. Any insights on this in relation to the Europe and other regional markets?
    • Any idea about the situation for baked goods in Latin America, Middle East, Asia, and Africa?
    • Any companies from Asia having a presence in the Americas and Europe region?
     
    Shilpa Wadji, Nov 29, 2017
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