Hot cross buns yeast

Discussion in 'Bread' started by Leebou, Mar 27, 2018.

  1. Leebou

    Leebou New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi everyone I’m hoping someone can help.I have been using a old Delilah hot cross bun recipe that calls for 1 tablespoon of yeast dissolved in hot water and sugar which I’ve been doing for a few years .this year however I’ve noticed the yeast I’ve been using should be added dry to the mix and then fluids later.whats the problem with doing it how I was?.should I be adding the yeast to the dry mix then adding the sugar and hot water that would have been in the original recipe to my other liquids.also it seems I should be using less yeast than the 1 tablespoon the recipe called for.
    Really hope someone can help I’m quite confused many thanks Lee
     
    Leebou, Mar 27, 2018
    #1
    Norcalbaker59 likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  2. Leebou

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2017
    Messages:
    1,428
    Likes Received:
    862
    Location:
    Northern California
    Welcome to the forum.

    Rehydration of yeast depends on the type of yeast you’re using.


    Active dry yeast is a different species of yeast from Instant dry yeast.

    Active dry yeast has much larger granules as well. Given the size of the granules, it is best to rehydrated before use. But if you add it to the dry ingredients, it will still work. It will just take longer for the dough to develop.

    Active dry yeast develops slowly than Instant dry yeast. It is best suited for dough with long fermentation and multiple ferment.

    Older recipes call for rehydrating the yeast since Active dry yeast was the only dry yeast available.

    ========

    Instant dry yeast is a relatively new product. Instant dry yeast Is formulated to mix into the dry ingredients. Since the granules are considerably smaller than Active dry yeast, it does not need to be dissolved. But it will not hurt it if you dissolve it before use.

    Instant dry yeast develops about 50% faster than active dry yeast. Since Instant dry yeast develops so quickly, it normally produces a very strong first rise, followed by a weaker second rise. That’s why it’s not suited to long fermentation doughs.

    For this reason I’m not a fan of Instant dry yeast.

    Regarding adjusting the amount of yeast...the ratio of flour, sugar and yeast should be considered before making any adjustment.

    2 1/4 teaspoons of yeast will leaven up to 560 grams flour (4 cups) with 100 grams (1/2 cup) of sugar.

    1 tablespoon of yeast is equivalent to 3 teaspoons.

    3 teaspoons of yeast is enough to leaven 700 grams of flour, mixed with 125 grams sugar.

    A tablespoon of yeast is more than the average recipe for a home baker.

    If you have used the recipe successfully for years with the stated amount of yeast and rehydrating the yeast, I say if it ain’t broke don’t fix it.

    Active Dry Yeast on left. Note the difference in granule size from the Instant Dry Yeast. They are different size because they are different species of yeast. And they are formulated to perform differently. The instant dry yeast develops 50% faster. So too much could result in over fermentation.
    2CB69C85-541E-4B04-BD88-228CE2352135.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, Mar 27, 2018
    #2
    Becky likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. Leebou

    Leebou New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2018
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Wow thank you so much for such a detailed and informative reply.The recipe asks for 1lb if flour and 50g of sugar to one level tablespoon of yeast so am I right in thinking for the instant yeast I would use half of that amount .
     
    Leebou, Mar 28, 2018
    #3
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.