Jumbo Hot Dog or Sausage Rolls?

Discussion in 'Bread' started by Mark Quinteros, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Mark Quinteros

    Mark Quinteros New Member

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    HI there,

    First time poster here!

    I am trying to work with my local baker to make a hawaaiin (porteguese) sweet bread hot dog rolls (attached pics).

    His specialty is in porteguese sweet bread, and not hot dog rolls...and I have a specialty in neither!

    I have 2 inch spikes that the rolls need to fit over (like you see around europe) that toast the buns from the inside.

    So basically the rolls need to be round (as pictured) with a 3-4" all the way around... that would give a 1 to 1 1/2 clearance to fit of the spike (as the picture shows)

    Anyone know the technique, pan etc to create these rolls, without having to hand craft each one?

    Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

    Mark Quinteros, Jul 14, 2017
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  2. Mark Quinteros

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Rolls have to be hand shaped unless you have a couple million dollars to invest in a mega mixer, extruder, and conveyor belt system to take dough from proofing to oven. That said I'm sure there are some techniques for mass production that you can apply on a smaller scale.

    Normally when a bakery decides to produce a new product and they're not sure of the production methods they hire a consultant.

    The European spike toaster isnt very common here. I've never seen a cylindrical roll pan here to make the round rolls..

    The only pans that I can think of in the US that might work are either a baguette pan or a New England hot dog roll pan. But the New England hotdog from pan will give you squared off sides. But that may not look bad. Rectangle bun with the hot dog inserted in the middle. It certainly would give your product a signature look.

    Baguette pans have the curved U shape on the bottom so you could create more of a round roll. But the pan is perforated so air circulates all the way around. Depending on the type of crust you want on your roll, a perforated pan may or may not be ideal. But you can certainly buy a small home baguette pan to experiment with.



    https://www.webstaurantstore.com/6-...MIw5rD-cWH1QIVxFx-Ch248gREEAQYAiABEgLnaPD_BwE


    https://www.webstaurantstore.com/ch...MI17uhpseH1QIVA5F-Ch1l7gMoEAQYAyABEgKi-fD_BwE


    http://www.sfbi.com/consulting.html
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 14, 2017
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  3. Mark Quinteros

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    Never seen a "spike toaster" much less ever heard of one.

    Is this something that bakes the bun from the inside?

    I'm not sure what you are meaning, if you want a hot dog bun using a 2 inch spike gadget.

    From what I am gathering from the pictures you have, you are wanting a large "pig in the blanket", because thats what it looks like in the photos you have. A sausage and cheese, covered in a bread roll.

    You don't need fancy gadgets for that. You just roll out your dough, cut the size you want, for the cheese and sausage you have, roll up the cheese and sausage inside, and bake it like that.

    You can use any kind of bread dough for this, as "pigs in blankets" work well with all bread types. I am especially fond of the sweet Hawaiian bread made with pineapple juice. Mmmmm

    If you want specialty made hot dog buns, then you might try "torpedo rolls", which can be used with the baguette pans Norcalbaker mentioned. Torpedo rolls are usually made from a light bread dough that gets slightly crusty on the outside. They are usually used for Po' Boys down here in the Southern USA, but they are good for pretty much any kind of sandwich....and I assume would work as well for Pigs in Blankets or hot dog buns.
     
    ChesterV, Jul 14, 2017
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  4. Mark Quinteros

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    In Europe they cut off one end of the roll slide it onto a spike that warms it up, then they stuff it with a hot dog.

    The spike toaster is expensive o_O

    https://www.webstaurantstore.com/si...-hot-dog-bun-warmer-110v-875w/980ROBERTO.html
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 14, 2017
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  5. Mark Quinteros

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    ChesterV, Jul 14, 2017
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  6. Mark Quinteros

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    And you can't put anything on your hot dog stuffed into a bun. It looks really cool, but I need mustard and relish at a minimum on my dog. No ketchup--never ketchup. :eek:
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 14, 2017
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  7. Mark Quinteros

    Mark Quinteros New Member

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    HI thanks for the replies everyone!

    yes so the 2 inch spike makes the hole big enough to stick all the sauces you want inside the bun.. then you slide the dog in after. the condiments rise up to the top!
     
    Mark Quinteros, Jul 14, 2017
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  8. Mark Quinteros

    Mark Quinteros New Member

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    Thanks!

    We are trying the new england pan (maybe too small) and baguette pans this week!
     
    Mark Quinteros, Jul 14, 2017
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  9. Mark Quinteros

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Mark, one last thing you can try is shape dough to the size you need, then proof on a linen couche. The couche keeps the dough shaped while it rises. They are frequently used in commercial bakeries for baguettes in order to maintain consistency in shape during the final rise. You can then transfer the shaped rolls straight to the oven deck or place on a baking tray.

    Wish you success on your endeavor.

    http://breadtopia.com/store/bakers-couche/
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 16, 2017
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  10. Mark Quinteros

    Mark Quinteros New Member

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    very helpful - I will have a chat with him and see how it goes! thank you!
     
    Mark Quinteros, Jul 17, 2017
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