Looking for a frosting recipe I remember as a kid


apacherose66

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I was born and raised in Syracuse, N.Y. and use to look forward as a kid to my bakery made birthday cakes. The subtle crunch of the roses. The one (of many that I loved) bakery I'll always remember is Liberty Bakery. I have never found a bakery or recipe that compares to that type of frosting. Can someone help me find a recipe for this type of frosting? I've tried many crusting, old fashioned, and etc... but NOTHING resembles or comes close.
 
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Becky

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Welcome to the forum :)

Is the bakery still around? If so then it might be worth getting in touch to ask. Even if they only tell you the type of frosting used then that's a good place to start. Something that is worth bearing in mind, though, is that our tastes change when we grow up, so there's a chance that the memory you have may not be achievable. I'm sure I remember reading somewhere that there is literally no limit to the level of sweetness that kids can enjoy, but this is not usually the case for adults. Also, the type of ingredients that professional bakeries use are often different to those available to home bakers. That being said it's still worth a try!
 

apacherose66

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Welcome to the forum :)

Is the bakery still around? If so then it might be worth getting in touch to ask. Even if they only tell you the type of frosting used then that's a good place to start. Something that is worth bearing in mind, though, is that our tastes change when we grow up, so there's a chance that the memory you have may not be achievable. I'm sure I remember reading somewhere that there is literally no limit to the level of sweetness that kids can enjoy, but this is not usually the case for adults. Also, the type of ingredients that professional bakeries use are often different to those available to home bakers. That being said it's still worth a try!
Thanks! I believe it is still around. I've been hesitant to ask because I felt like I would be infringing on their recipe secrets. But perhaps asking what type would be a start! It wasn't the sweetness, but the texture. It had a subtle crunch to it. I thought it may have been an Italian buttercream (predominantly Italian heritage area when I was a kid), but it wasn't the same.
 

Norcalbaker59

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I was born and raised in Syracuse, N.Y. and use to look forward as a kid to my bakery made birthday cakes. The subtle crunch of the roses. The one (of many that I loved) bakery I'll always remember is Liberty Bakery. I have never found a bakery or recipe that compares to that type of frosting. Can someone help me find a recipe for this type of frosting? I've tried many crusting, old fashioned, and etc... but NOTHING resembles or comes close.
Becky is correct, the use of commercial products is the determining factor with crusting frostings.

The texture of a crusting buttercream depends on high ratio shortening and the ratio of powdered sugar to high ratio shortening. High ratio shortening is not readily available to bakers as it is produced for the trade.

High ratio shortening is pure partially hydrogenated oil (PHO). The FDA, which regulates food ingredients, has banned the use of PHO’s in food applications due to its adverse effects on health. The full ban goes into effect June of this year.

In anticipation of that ban, manufactures of PHO high ratio shortening already changed their formulas. The newly formulated high ratio shortenings do not have the same stability as PHO high ratio shortening. Frosting made with the reformulated high ratio shortenings barely crust, and often breaks down before the cake is even sliced.

So it’s not likely you will be able to reproduce that nearly crunchy crusting buttercream you remember as a child.
 

ChesterV

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Yes, I remember crusty roses on my Bday cakes when I was little as well. Crusty on the outside, soft and creamy on the inside. Mmmmmmm

As Norcalbaker says, it all depends on the different measurements of ingredients and the types of lard/oil/butter used.

If this was a true old fashioned bakery, then they probably used a small amount of shortening with a large amount of butter in their buttercream. This crusts very well. A higher ratio of powdered sugar to pure shortening gives the same results, but the taste is a bit different. So yes, it all depends on the recipe they use or used.

But as the years go by, different people work in the bakeries and recipes change. Even if they use the same standard recipe, I'm sure that things aren't measured exactly............as how I did when I was working in bakeries back when.

But, in all logic and reality...............a nice crusting frosting really depends on how long you let it "dry". The longer you let it sit out, the drier and crustier it will get.

I've had people complain about some of the buttercream I've used in the past, simply because we weren't allowed to make cakes ahead of time, we had to make them in time for the customer to pick them up. So the cakes I decorated with buttercream never had a chance to sit around and get crusty, and they people would bring them back and complain it wasn't buttercream. And I would have to explain the whole thing to them.
 

apacherose66

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Becky is correct, the use of commercial products is the determining factor with crusting frostings.

The texture of a crusting buttercream depends on high ratio shortening and the ratio of powdered sugar to high ratio shortening. High ratio shortening is not readily available to bakers as it is produced for the trade.

High ratio shortening is pure partially hydrogenated oil (PHO). The FDA, which regulates food ingredients, has banned the use of PHO’s in food applications due to its adverse effects on health. The full ban goes into effect June of this year.

In anticipation of that ban, manufactures of PHO high ratio shortening already changed their formulas. The newly formulated high ratio shortenings do not have the same stability as PHO high ratio shortening. Frosting made with the reformulated high ratio shortenings barely crust, and often breaks down before the cake is even sliced.

So it’s not likely you will be able to reproduce that nearly crunchy crusting buttercream you remember as a child.
So, sweetex will no longer be available? UGH!!!
 
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apacherose66

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Yes, I remember crusty roses on my Bday cakes when I was little as well. Crusty on the outside, soft and creamy on the inside. Mmmmmmm

As Norcalbaker says, it all depends on the different measurements of ingredients and the types of lard/oil/butter used.

If this was a true old fashioned bakery, then they probably used a small amount of shortening with a large amount of butter in their buttercream. This crusts very well. A higher ratio of powdered sugar to pure shortening gives the same results, but the taste is a bit different. So yes, it all depends on the recipe they use or used.

But as the years go by, different people work in the bakeries and recipes change. Even if they use the same standard recipe, I'm sure that things aren't measured exactly............as how I did when I was working in bakeries back when.

But, in all logic and reality...............a nice crusting frosting really depends on how long you let it "dry". The longer you let it sit out, the drier and crustier it will get.

I've had people complain about some of the buttercream I've used in the past, simply because we weren't allowed to make cakes ahead of time, we had to make them in time for the customer to pick them up. So the cakes I decorated with buttercream never had a chance to sit around and get crusty, and they people would bring them back and complain it wasn't buttercream. And I would have to explain the whole thing to them.
I'm glad someone besides myself remembers the deliciousness and subtle crunch of a true crusting buttercream. I guess I'm going to have to just play around and see what I can come up with. Thanks!
 

ChesterV

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I'm glad someone besides myself remembers the deliciousness and subtle crunch of a true crusting buttercream. I guess I'm going to have to just play around and see what I can come up with. Thanks!
If you look for recipes online, try using a search term like "old fashioned crusting buttercream". I've found that, depending on what you are looking for, using "old fashioned" usually brings up different suggestions.
 
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Norcalbaker59

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So, sweetex will no longer be available? UGH!!!
Sweetex is still on the market, but it’s refomulated. It’s now made with palm oil. The reformulated shortening does not perform any where near the original. As a general rule I do not use shortening. But I bought some recently just to understand how it’s performing. Its way too soft. I can see the difference in the container.
 

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