Looking for white/wholewheat blend bread recipe

Discussion in 'Bread' started by WilburM, Jun 12, 2019.

  1. WilburM

    WilburM New Member

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    a few years ago, the best bread ever was discontinued. I have never found a good replacement so I've decide to try making it myself. It was a fairly plain free-form, lightly crusty loaf of a combination of white and white wheat flour. I've been googling but only find recipes with "white whole wheat" which is NOT what I'm looking for.

    Can anyone direct me to such a recipe? Or tell me how to modify some other recipe?

    Thanks a lot!

    Ps. I do not want a "no knead" recipe.
     
    WilburM, Jun 12, 2019
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  2. WilburM

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    J13, Jun 13, 2019
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  3. WilburM

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, you said you weren't looking for white whole wheat but white wheat....hm....
     
    J13, Jun 14, 2019
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  4. WilburM

    WilburM New Member

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    okay, I see a typo(?) in my post. should say blend of white and whole wheat flours. a lady at my grocery found a recipe I'm going to try. Question: does having a starter mean it's sourdough?

    Thanks for your posts!
     
    WilburM, Jun 14, 2019
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  5. WilburM

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    So glad you found the recipe! I hope you'll post it? Having just jumped into the deep end of the starter pool and been given a crash course in the subject...yes on the "Sourdough" question. Sourdough/Tartine breads always use a starter, and the starter is what gives sourdough it's sour flavor. "Sourdough," however is a misleading name for these breads, as not every loaf using a starter turns out "sour."

    Which is why a lot of bakers prefer to call breads using a starter "Slow Rise" rather than sourdough. The point of the starter isn't, in fact, to make all loaves sour, but to proof them slowly (up to 16 hours overnight in the refrigerator), rather than quickly as with instant rise yeast (a few hours on the kitchen counter). This slow rise overnight creates complex flavors...including sour ones *if* you want them and/or if that's what the recipe you're using will give you.

    You can make your own starter (takes 8 days)—or you can buy one. King Arthur flour sells sourdough starters. Either way, be prepared to feed it. Even if you buy one, or get some from a friend, it will need a certain amount of nursing before you can make bread with it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
    J13, Jun 15, 2019
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  6. WilburM

    WilburM New Member

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    Okay, that was a disaster! LOL, ended up with a brick. Way too much flour! lesson learned. we'll see how the next attempt goes.

    thanks for info!
     
    WilburM, Jun 17, 2019
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  7. WilburM

    WilburM New Member

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    Well, I've tried a few recipes with the modifications I've made. I've lowered the yeast repeatedly as well as substituted ingredients. But every loaf since the first has been edible, the last several being quite desirable, at least from my neighbor's point of view.

    The thing is, though, I want to make a tougher, stronger bread. Everything has been very light and soft no matter what changes I make. I've tried adding gluten, allowed less rising, used oats and oat flour. I've used honey and I've used sugar, including some dark brown molasses sugar.

    I Google "hearty" bread but that seems to indicate whole grains and the like. The store bread that I liked and would like to emulate must have been way less than half whole wheat, based on its light color. And with no nuts, seeds or other such extras.

    Having fun, though. Good to have a neighbor who likes bread.

    I'll post a recipe as soon as I get something a little better.
     
    WilburM, Jul 6, 2019
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  8. WilburM

    KarenCT New Member

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    You can also make Poolish, and I believe KAF's website has the recipe. Much less time-involved than making a true sourdough starter. You can make it the night before, around 12 hrs. before you make the bread. Good luck!
     
    KarenCT, Nov 5, 2019
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