Looking for white/wholewheat blend bread recipe


Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
a few years ago, the best bread ever was discontinued. I have never found a good replacement so I've decide to try making it myself. It was a fairly plain free-form, lightly crusty loaf of a combination of white and white wheat flour. I've been googling but only find recipes with "white whole wheat" which is NOT what I'm looking for.

Can anyone direct me to such a recipe? Or tell me how to modify some other recipe?

Thanks a lot!

Ps. I do not want a "no knead" recipe.
 
Ad

Advertisements

J13

Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
120
Sorry, you said you weren't looking for white whole wheat but white wheat....hm....
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Sorry, you said you weren't looking for white whole wheat but white wheat....hm....
okay, I see a typo(?) in my post. should say blend of white and whole wheat flours. a lady at my grocery found a recipe I'm going to try. Question: does having a starter mean it's sourdough?

Thanks for your posts!
 

J13

Joined
May 21, 2019
Messages
248
Reaction score
120
okay, I see a typo(?) in my post. should say blend of white and whole wheat flours. a lady at my grocery found a recipe I'm going to try. Question: does having a starter mean it's sourdough?
So glad you found the recipe! I hope you'll post it? Having just jumped into the deep end of the starter pool and been given a crash course in the subject...yes on the "Sourdough" question. Sourdough/Tartine breads always use a starter, and the starter is what gives sourdough it's sour flavor. "Sourdough," however is a misleading name for these breads, as not every loaf using a starter turns out "sour."

Which is why a lot of bakers prefer to call breads using a starter "Slow Rise" rather than sourdough. The point of the starter isn't, in fact, to make all loaves sour, but to proof them slowly (up to 16 hours overnight in the refrigerator), rather than quickly as with instant rise yeast (a few hours on the kitchen counter). This slow rise overnight creates complex flavors...including sour ones *if* you want them and/or if that's what the recipe you're using will give you.

You can make your own starter (takes 8 days)—or you can buy one. King Arthur flour sells sourdough starters. Either way, be prepared to feed it. Even if you buy one, or get some from a friend, it will need a certain amount of nursing before you can make bread with it.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Okay, that was a disaster! LOL, ended up with a brick. Way too much flour! lesson learned. we'll see how the next attempt goes.

thanks for info!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
0
Well, I've tried a few recipes with the modifications I've made. I've lowered the yeast repeatedly as well as substituted ingredients. But every loaf since the first has been edible, the last several being quite desirable, at least from my neighbor's point of view.

The thing is, though, I want to make a tougher, stronger bread. Everything has been very light and soft no matter what changes I make. I've tried adding gluten, allowed less rising, used oats and oat flour. I've used honey and I've used sugar, including some dark brown molasses sugar.

I Google "hearty" bread but that seems to indicate whole grains and the like. The store bread that I liked and would like to emulate must have been way less than half whole wheat, based on its light color. And with no nuts, seeds or other such extras.

Having fun, though. Good to have a neighbor who likes bread.

I'll post a recipe as soon as I get something a little better.
 
Joined
Jun 14, 2015
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Okay, that was a disaster! LOL, ended up with a brick. Way too much flour! lesson learned. we'll see how the next attempt goes.

thanks for info!
You can also make Poolish, and I believe KAF's website has the recipe. Much less time-involved than making a true sourdough starter. You can make it the night before, around 12 hrs. before you make the bread. Good luck!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Sep 24, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
3
This is recipe that I like, if you are still looking. Add a boiling pan of water for some steam if you want a
thicker crust.

LMHmedchem

Code:
White and Whole Wheat Bread

3     tsp    tablespoon active dry yeast
¼     tsp    sugar (to bloom the yeast)
2     cups   water (at room temperature, divided)
3     tbl    butter (softened)
2     tbl    sugar
1     tsp    salt
4     tsp    vital wheat gluten (skip if you are using bread flour)
3½-4  cups   all-purpose flour
1½    cups   white whole-wheat flour
2     tbl    butter (melted for basting)

Set aside ½ cup of the water. Bloom the yeast by adding the yeast and ¼ tsp of sugar to the remaining
1½ cups of water. Mix with a small whisk until the yeast has dissolved. Allow the yeast to bloom until there
is ⅛” of foam on top of the solution. While the yeast is blooming, add the other ½ cup of water, the
gluten, and 2 cups of the all-purpose flour to the butter and sugar mixture in the mixing bowl.

When the yeast has bloomed, add the yeast and water mixture to the mixing bowl and mix on low with the
paddle until a smooth batter is formed. Scrape down the sides of the bowl to make sure that all of the
ingredients have been incorporated. Switch to the dough hook and add the whole wheat flour and 1½ cups
of the remaining all-purpose flour. Mix with the dough hook until a sticky dough is formed. The dough should
clean the sides of the bowl but stick to the bottom of the bowl creating a foot that is 2-4 inches across. The
dough should stick to your finger when touched. Slowly add up to ½ cup of additional flour until the dough is
the correct consistency. If the dough does not create a foot, add 1 or 2 tbl of water and 1 or 2 tsp of additional
flour. It is difficult to incorporate water after the dough has formed a ball, so be cautious when adding the flour.

Knead with the dough hook on the lowest speed for 15 minutes. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. You
will probably need a silicone spatula to get the dough out of the bowl. Knead by hand for an additional 5 minutes
until the dough is elastic enough for a 1” ball to stretch 4” before breaking. Use a scraper to clean the dough off
of the kneading surface. Don’t add too much flour or the dough will dry out. After kneading, place the dough in an
oiled square 6”x6” square covered container. Let the dough raise at room temperature until doubled.
Do not over prove.

Drop the dough from the container onto floured surface. Press out the air and form into 2 loaves. The easiest way
to do this is to divide the dough by weight and then roll each piece into a log. Press in each log at the ends to get
the right length and then tuck under the sides. Place in greased bread loaf pans. Place the pans on a baking sheet
in a turkey roasting bag. Close the end of the bag and tuck it under the baking sheet to force some air into the bag. Prove at room temperature until doubled (30-60 minutes depending on the temperature). The dough should spring
back when touched. Do not over prove or the loaf may collapse during cooking. Make sure that the oven has come
up to temperature before proving is finished.

Preheat oven to 410F°

Bake at 410F° for 10 minutes. Reduce temperature to 400F° and bake 10 more minutes. Remove from the oven
and brush each loaf with a tablespoon of melted butter. Reduce temperature to 375F° and bake 5-10 more minutes
until golden brown and the internal temperature of the bread reads right around 200 F°.
[\code]
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top