Looking for a recipe and understanding of what soda bread is

Discussion in 'Bread' started by primalclaws1974, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. primalclaws1974

    primalclaws1974 Well-Known Member

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    I believe I have it before. Is it similar to the cheesy biscuits you can get at Red Lobster for free, minus the cheese? I really look that bread if it is similar. I don't eat a lot of cheese, as I am attempting to lose excess weight. Cheese doesn't add that much flavor to the bread. Does anyone have a soda bread recipe? Is it not what I think it is? Do you like the taste? Thanks.
     
    primalclaws1974, Jan 15, 2015
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  2. primalclaws1974

    Tina Nord Well-Known Member

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    Go to Allrecipes.com and there are many variations depending on what you like. It is typically known as Irish Soda Bread and it does have sort of the same consistency as a biscuit, except so much better.
     
    Tina Nord, Jan 15, 2015
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  3. primalclaws1974

    DancingLady Well-Known Member

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    Soda bread uses baking soda and baking powder to rise instead of yeast. Irish soda bread is very easy to make. There are quite a few recipes out there for it so you can easily find it on any good recipe site. I usually have used raisins instead of currents though.
     
    DancingLady, Jan 16, 2015
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  4. primalclaws1974

    primalclaws1974 Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like it may be more similar to tea biscuits or other lightly sweet biscuits than what I was imaging. I don't mind tea biscuits with cream, but I am not wild about raisin bread. I may have to check out a recipe site. Thanks for the help.
     
    primalclaws1974, Jan 17, 2015
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  5. primalclaws1974

    Tina Nord Well-Known Member

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    When I make it, I don't make it sweet at all because I usually have it with dinner. It has a crusty outside and a soft interior, much like an artisan bread. What you spice or flavor it with is up to you. When it is plain it is not sweet at all.
     
    Tina Nord, Jan 17, 2015
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  6. primalclaws1974

    primalclaws1974 Well-Known Member

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    What makes this different than leavened or unleavened bread? It sounds similar. I figured the bread would have a natural taste on it's own, different than other breads, but it sounds like it needs to be flavored. What makes this bread stand out? Or is this merely a simple way that people in the past made bread when they didn't have certain ingredients?
     
    primalclaws1974, Jan 18, 2015
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  7. primalclaws1974

    Tina Nord Well-Known Member

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    I think it is more of a peasant bread, the kind people used to make when they had no money to spend on expensive ingredients. I have seen recipes for soda bread in farming cookbooks too. Baking soda and baking powder acts as a very inexpensive yeast when used in large quanitites like you find in soda bread. You do not have to wait for bread to rise or the temperature of the yeast to be just right. You just mix the bread ingredients together and pop it in the oven for the specified time.
     
    Tina Nord, Jan 23, 2015
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  8. primalclaws1974

    primalclaws1974 Well-Known Member

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    So, is this bread similar to flat bread? Is it the basis for what regular saltine soda crackers are made from? This seems to be almost like pita bread as well, but maybe a little more dense and dry. What is eaten with soda bread? Is it soaps? Or is it a standalone food?
     
    primalclaws1974, Jan 25, 2015
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  9. primalclaws1974

    PattyCakes Well-Known Member

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    I'm Irish, and I grew up on soda bread. It's made by using bicarb of soda and buttermilk which together react to make the bread rise. The trick is not to over mix the dough, and once you've shaped it and cut the cross in it, you must get it into the oven straight away if if you want it light and well risen.

    Do not add baking powder!! It must be bicarb of soda and buttermilk. Here's my recipe (been in my family for years) which can be tweaked to use white or wholemeal flour, and even a few raisins are popular too. See below for other variations.
    • * 500g plain flour
    • * 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
    • * 1 tsp fine sea salt
    • * Approx. 400ml buttermilk or live yoghurt
    • * A little milk, if necessary
    1. Sift the flour and bicarbonate of soda into a large mixing bowl and stir in the salt. Make a well in the centre and pour in the buttermilk, stirring as you go. If necessary, add a tablespoon or two of milk to bring the mixture together; it should form a soft dough, just this side of sticky.

    2. Tip it out on to a lightly floured work surface and knead lightly for about a minute, just long enough to pull it together into a loose ball but no longer – you need to get it into the oven while the bicarb is still doing its stuff. You're not looking for the kind of smooth, elastic dough you’d get with a yeast-based bread.

    3. Put the round of dough on a lightly floured baking sheet and dust generously with flour. Mark a deep cross in it with a sharp, serrated knife, cutting about two-thirds of the way through the loaf. Put it in an oven preheated to 200oC/gas mark 6 and bake for 40-45 minutes, until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped underneath.

    4. Cool on a wire rack if you like a crunchy crust, or wrap in a clean tea towel if you prefer a soft crust. Soda bread is best eaten while still warm, spread with salty butter and/or a dollop of your favourite jam. But if you have some left over the next day, it makes great toast.

    Variation: For six-seed soda bread, mix together 2 tablespoons each of sunflower, pumpkin, sesame, poppy and linseeds, plus 1 teaspoon of fennel seeds; set aside. Follow the main recipe but use half white flour and half wholemeal flour. Add all but 1 tablespoon of the seeds to the dry ingredients before proceeding as above. After cutting a cross in the top of the loaf, brush it with a little buttermilk or ordinary milk and sprinkle with the remaining seeds. Bake at 200oC/gas mark 6 for 40–45 minutes.
     
    PattyCakes, Jan 30, 2015
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