Macarons with organic cane sugar versus refined white sugar?


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HI! I've successfully used white sugar to make macarons with no issues. However, I used organic cane sugar in a recent bath instead of white refined sugar - it took way longer to form stiff peaks (Swiss method) and then the batter was difficult (stiff) to fold and difficult to get that ribbon batter consistency. I think I ended up over mixing and the macs did not come out pretty (puffed up, cracked tops, nipples, edges came out wavy as if the hardened, dried shells were pulled when the interior batter baked in the oven- it ended up looking like a flower sort of). Anyone know if organic cane sugar can affect the batter this way? Maybe it's less processed than refined sugar? It does have a slight "blond" tint. Any help appreciated!
 
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HI! I've successfully used white sugar to make macarons with no issues. However, I used organic cane sugar in a recent bath instead of white refined sugar - it took way longer to form stiff peaks (Swiss method) and then the batter was difficult (stiff) to fold and difficult to get that ribbon batter consistency. I think I ended up over mixing and the macs did not come out pretty (puffed up, cracked tops, nipples, edges came out wavy as if the hardened, dried shells were pulled when the interior batter baked in the oven- it ended up looking like a flower sort of). Anyone know if organic cane sugar can affect the batter this way? Maybe it's less processed than refined sugar? It does have a slight "blond" tint. Any help appreciated!
Organic cane sugar is a single crystallized sugar. This means the sugar cane is crushed; solids are removed; the cane juice heated to concentrate into a syrup; it’s then centrifuged to separate the sugar from the molasses. But some molasses remains in the sugar.



The sugar syrup is then crystallized. This less refined sugar has more minerals and some molasses in. It has larger and irregular shaped crystal than conventional granulated sugar.



Conventional granulated sugar differs in that it is made by re-melting conventional single crystallization sugar and processing it a second time to remove all traces of molasses and minerals. It is then recrystallized a second time.



Whipped egg whites are very much effected by sugar.



The sugar plays in important role in the structure of the foam and stability of the egg whites. so yes the type of sugar matters. And when you add it to whipped egg whites matters.





I recently wrote about whipped egg whites and meringue on a couple of other posts.





You can read what I wrote about whipped egg whites here.



https://www.baking-forums.com/threads/piping-flowers.6133/#post-42347







I have a little discussion about making meringues and the significance of the sugar in this post. It builds on the discussion from the earlier post.





https://www.baking-forums.com/threads/oat-flour-substitution-adjusting-recipe.6196/#post-42608
 
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thank you so much, this is exactly what i was looking for!
Yes unfortunately baking is a chemical reaction of the ingredients to time and temperature. So there isn’t much wiggle room. Comes down to those molecules. What we can’t see either wreaks havoc on everything in an instant or creates a display of glorious cookies too beautiful to eat. There’s no in between with those molecules!!!
 

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