Pie Crust Fluting & A Good "Shortbread" Crust

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Hi all! I have a home baking business. Currently, I only use my all-butter crust, which has been successful, but I'd like to expand my offerings. I've been checking out some pie shops across the country to see what other crusts I might consider, and I keep seeing a "shortbread" crust that appears to hold its fluting well. I can't seem to find a good "shortbread" crust recipe. I assume it is some variation of a pâte sucrée, but I can't seem to get one that rolls out and holds its shape the way a pie crust ought to.

I'm also seeing some thick crust edges, and I had never before considered how that might improve the fluting's hold, but I can't figure out the technique. I fold under (I've also seen it folded over), but even rolling it out to a 15" circle on a 9" pie plate doesn't give me the thickness I'm seeing. Not to mention, there will be time adjustments.

I have included some sample photos of crusts labeled "shortbread" and made with a large fluting. I've also included one with some seriously thick crust.

Do you have any tips for achieving a "crust lovers" thickness? Do you have any recipes you'd like to share for a sweet crust that could be called "shortbread"?

Thanks in advance!
Screenshot 2024-04-03 at 8.10.41 PM.pngScreenshot 2024-04-03 at 8.12.21 PM.pngScreenshot 2024-04-03 at 8.12.42 PM.png
 
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Hi all! I have a home baking business. Currently, I only use my all-butter crust, which has been successful, but I'd like to expand my offerings. I've been checking out some pie shops across the country to see what other crusts I might consider, and I keep seeing a "shortbread" crust that appears to hold its fluting well. I can't seem to find a good "shortbread" crust recipe. I assume it is some variation of a pâte sucrée, but I can't seem to get one that rolls out and holds its shape the way a pie crust ought to.

I'm also seeing some thick crust edges, and I had never before considered how that might improve the fluting's hold, but I can't figure out the technique. I fold under (I've also seen it folded over), but even rolling it out to a 15" circle on a 9" pie plate doesn't give me the thickness I'm seeing. Not to mention, there will be time adjustments.

I have included some sample photos of crusts labeled "shortbread" and made with a large fluting. I've also included one with some seriously thick crust.

Do you have any tips for achieving a "crust lovers" thickness? Do you have any recipes you'd like to share for a sweet crust that could be called "shortbread"?

Thanks in advance!
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If your pie dough is all butter, it will not hold its shape or a fluted edge well.

For a crust that holds it shape you need to use all shortening or a combination of butter and shortening.

Pie dough must rest, preferably overnight, to allow the flour to fully hydrate.

The pie crust should be well chilled after rolling and placed in the pie plate, then the filled pie should be chilled again before baking.

TBH a really thick crust like the photo showing the cross-section slice is not ideal for eating. A very dense crust is hard, rather than flaky; notice the white dough showing under the fluted edge, that is very bland. The browning of crust is from the maillard reaction; flavor comes from the maillard reaction, so the dough that doesn't go through that chemical reactions remains bland. But if that is the look you like, do not roll the edges of the dough as thin as the center. Always roll from the center out in one direction, then turn the dough 1/4 turn, and roll from center. Take care to roll the pin across the dough instead of pressing and stretching it. once the dough is close to the size you want, do not roll all the way out to the end.

Also, make sure you are making enough dough. Just because the dough is rolled into a 15” round doesn't mean there is enough dough for a thicker edge. To calculate dough needs for a single crust, add diameter of pie plate + depth of side + 3” for edge.

Example 9” pie plate + 2” side + 3” edge = 14”.

For ever inch of pie plate, use 20 g flour.

14” pie plate x 20 g flour = 280 g flour for a single crust.

Bakers percentages for standard pie crust:
  • Flour 100%
  • Fat 70%
  • Ice Water 30% (up to 33% depending on type of flour)
  • Sugar 5% (for browning)
  • Salt 1.5% dissolve in ice water

Regarding pate sucree, these doughs are tast doughs. The ratios are such that the doughs are softer and crumblier than American pie dough so do not handle and bake up like American pie crust.

Shortbread dough is very crumbly. It is normally pressed into a baking ring or shortbread pan. If you want to make a shortbread crust, look for a rolled shortbread cookie recipe. Just keep in mind it will not have the sturdiness of pie dough and will bake up differently.
 
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here you go.
1 lb fat ( 50/50) butter and marg works good.
20oz flour.
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup sugar.
Run this in the mixer with a padlle to make a dry rub like pie dough.

Add 2 eggs and mix 30 seconds or less to make a smooth dough.

chill 1 hr to make it easier to roll, this holds together well and works for sweet or savory .
 
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here you go.
1 lb fat ( 50/50) butter and marg works good.
20oz flour.
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 cup sugar.
Run this in the mixer with a padlle to make a dry rub like pie dough.

Add 2 eggs and mix 30 seconds or less to make a smooth dough.

chill 1 hr to make it easier to roll, this holds together well and works for sweet or savory .
This is exactly what I was looking for! Thank you so much :)
 
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Hey! Shortbread crusts are great for fluting. Try using a higher butter to flour ratio than pate sucree. For thickness, fold the dough in thirds before rolling out. This creates layers and a thicker edge. Good luck!
 

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